Archive for August, 2015

Books Read in August

The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics (8) – This slim book is a must for anyone regularly involved in the creation of charts and graphs. The text is clear and direct, with many pages of do’s and don’ts sitting side by side so you can see both how to do it and how not to. Highly recommended and a super quick read.
Ironskin (11) – I picked this up after reading a chapter from the third novel in this series in Women Destroy Fantasy. This was a thoroughly enjoyable read that felt like a cross between a Jane Austen novel and faerie tales. Connolly does a frighteningly good job at writing the inner dialogue of depression, self loathing and anger.
Atomic Size Matters (13) – Dr. Veronica Berns turned a chapter of her chemistry thesis into a lovely little comic. I backed the KickStarter. It’s an interesting look at some the tools of modern chemistry and a quick read.
Artificial Intelligence for Humans, Volume 1: Fundamental Algorithms (15) – This first volume of author Jeff Heaton’s ongoing series of AI texts was KickStarted in 2013.  Its promise, an intro to AI concepts and algorithms that wouldn’t require advanced maths, was appealing.  That, plus an ambitious end goal of six interconnected volumes and ample example code available through GitHub, convinced me to back the project.  Heaton stayed true to his goal and explains many of the fundamental algorithms (Euclidean distance, k-means clustering, and simulated annealing) without the need for complicated math.  With that said, there were still a couple of sections where I felt I would have benefited from either a better math background or a more in-depth explanation of the math involved.  In particular the section on RBF functions and the RBF network model left me wanting more. Still, I’d recommend this book to any programmer interested in AI whose math may be rusty (like mine is), but whose still comfortable with mathematical notation (i.e. “f(x)”, “Σ“, etc.).  I’ve already backed the second and third volumes in the series and I look forward to working my way through all six volumes.  For those still intimidated by the math, it may be best to wait for the last volume (a prequel “volume zero”) which is an intro to the math of AI.
The Internet of Garbage (16) – Sarah Jeong, the co-author of Five Useful Articles, a comedic copyright newsletter, writes a clear and crisp description of the issues surrounding online harassment in this short e-book.  Likening our current situation to the early days of dealing with spam, she shows how we can learn from that history to build tools that can help foster safe online spaces.  A quick and interesting read.
Elektrograd: Rusted Blood (20) – The second of Warren Ellis’ self-published e-book shorts.  This one’s a sci-fi noir detective story set in “a strange dream of a possible city.  A science fiction mystery about theoretical architecture, AI and vintage robotics.”  It has the feel of a graphic novel and was a fun and interesting read.  I especially enjoyed the way it hinted at a larger world (one that Ellis has indicated we might see more of in future shorts).
The BreakBeat Poets (26) – This collection of poetry was put together by a trio of Chicago poets, including Kevin Coval, founder of Louder Than a Bomb.  I’m still fairly new to reading poetry so getting through this took me quite some time.  I thought I was into hip hop, but the sheer number of references that went over my head made it clear that I’ve still got a lot to learn about the genre.  With all that said, I still found this collection full of powerful poems and l dog eared many a page.  Many of the poets involved are from and write about Chicago which is always a plus in my book.

Books read in July

Freakangels (1) – I recently remembered that Warren Ellis’ Freakangels comic was available online in its entirety for free. So of course I went ahead and devoured it immediately. It was a great comics binge. It’s a coming of age story and a tale of arrested development for a group of super human psychics living in the flooded husk of London. I wanted it to last forever, but like any good coming of age story it had to end sometime. Paul Duffield’s art is fantastic and the writing is both playful and grim. If you’re reading it online in its original format you’ll be treated to the webcomics standard of skip week explanations and the occasional con report. Kind of interesting in a historical way but really skippable if you want to.

Women Destroy Fantasy! Special Issue (19) – This special issue of Fantasy magazine was the result of reaching a stretch goal on Lightspeed’s Women Destroy Science Fiction! KickStarter (which I backed). This issue is filled with short stories that ranged from good to great (including an excellent retelling of the Cinderella story by T. Kingfisher) and so-so interviews. There’s also a super useful section of women writing fantasy compiled by the contributors. I had mixed feelings about that section because on the one hand I hadn’t read or heard of many of the recommended authors and books and felt like that makes me part of the problem; but on the other hand, here were a bunch of highly recommended fantasy books I hadn’t read yet*!

*At least one of these books is already on it’s way to my house 🙂


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