Posts Tagged 'AI'

Books read in November and December

Injection Volume 1 (11/8) – The first trade paperback for Warren Ellis’ new series. It’s grim and weird and I’m excited to see where he takes it. The art is really good for the most part, though there were a couple sections that were hard for me to follow what was happening.

Elektrograd (11/18) – The latest short in Warren Ellis’ Summon Books series is a retro future noir story based in an experimental city inspired by real life experimental architecture. It reads like a graphic novel (and the afterword confirms that it was originally written with that in mind).

@liketocontinue (12/7) – Matt Webb’s robot poem was great fun to read. It comes in 36 Tweets and the only way to get the next one is to hit the like button. It’s got word play, experimentation with form, cleverness. Robots and emotions. Robot mediated poetry at it’s finest.

Speak (12/8) – Absolutely wonderful.  Looping, self referential at multiple levels, poignant and, at times, heartbreaking.  The most human take on advanced AI I’ve come across.

Virtually Human (12/14) – This is a book of philosophy. If you approach it expecting something more technical, as I did, you will be disappointed. It took me a couple of chapters to realign my expectations but once I did I was well rewarded. The main thrust of the book is this: conscious artificial intelligences are coming and with them a host of philosophical, legal and moral quandaries. She focuses primarily on a type of artificial consciousness she thinks will be most prevalent, which she terms “mindclones.” A mindclone is a cyber consciousness made from the digital exhaust of a biological one. Creating a mindclone, in her view, will not create a new person, but merely extend the consciousness of the biological original to a new substrate. She argues that they will be the same person and legally and culturally recognized as such.

Unfortunately she seems to have trouble coming down on what mindclones and other AIs will be able to consent to. While much of the philosophical and moral arguments are inclusive of these new consciousnesses in humanity, the more technical sections seem to waffle between treating them as consenting adults and as efficiency improving tools whose owners can tweak them at will.  Nevertheless I found many of the philosophical arguments intriguing, and it’s a pleasant surprise that someone is thinking these things already.

Suicide by Jaguar (12/17) – David Landsberger‘s first book of poetry is short and sweet. The overwhelming majority of my family’s American contingent is based in Miami, giving me just enough familiarity with the city to recognize it in these poems. Unsurprisingly my favorites were those for and about Chicago including the sweet summer capsule of Chicago Haiku 1 and Chicago Elegy, a bittersweet homage to urban wildlife.  All the poems are translated into Spanish which is appropriate for both Chicago and Miami.  One day I hope to speak Spanish well enough to comment on the quality of the translations, but for now I’ll just say it makes me happy that they’re there.

Submergence (12/26) – The language in this sparse and introspective novel is often lyrical, though the narrative meanders and is ultimately unsatisfying.  I found myself really enjoying certain passages of this book but never really understanding where it was going.  I’m not sure if those are issues with the book or the reader, but I have a hard time recommending it.

Books Read in August

The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics (8) – This slim book is a must for anyone regularly involved in the creation of charts and graphs. The text is clear and direct, with many pages of do’s and don’ts sitting side by side so you can see both how to do it and how not to. Highly recommended and a super quick read.
Ironskin (11) – I picked this up after reading a chapter from the third novel in this series in Women Destroy Fantasy. This was a thoroughly enjoyable read that felt like a cross between a Jane Austen novel and faerie tales. Connolly does a frighteningly good job at writing the inner dialogue of depression, self loathing and anger.
Atomic Size Matters (13) – Dr. Veronica Berns turned a chapter of her chemistry thesis into a lovely little comic. I backed the KickStarter. It’s an interesting look at some the tools of modern chemistry and a quick read.
Artificial Intelligence for Humans, Volume 1: Fundamental Algorithms (15) – This first volume of author Jeff Heaton’s ongoing series of AI texts was KickStarted in 2013.  Its promise, an intro to AI concepts and algorithms that wouldn’t require advanced maths, was appealing.  That, plus an ambitious end goal of six interconnected volumes and ample example code available through GitHub, convinced me to back the project.  Heaton stayed true to his goal and explains many of the fundamental algorithms (Euclidean distance, k-means clustering, and simulated annealing) without the need for complicated math.  With that said, there were still a couple of sections where I felt I would have benefited from either a better math background or a more in-depth explanation of the math involved.  In particular the section on RBF functions and the RBF network model left me wanting more. Still, I’d recommend this book to any programmer interested in AI whose math may be rusty (like mine is), but whose still comfortable with mathematical notation (i.e. “f(x)”, “Σ“, etc.).  I’ve already backed the second and third volumes in the series and I look forward to working my way through all six volumes.  For those still intimidated by the math, it may be best to wait for the last volume (a prequel “volume zero”) which is an intro to the math of AI.
The Internet of Garbage (16) – Sarah Jeong, the co-author of Five Useful Articles, a comedic copyright newsletter, writes a clear and crisp description of the issues surrounding online harassment in this short e-book.  Likening our current situation to the early days of dealing with spam, she shows how we can learn from that history to build tools that can help foster safe online spaces.  A quick and interesting read.
Elektrograd: Rusted Blood (20) – The second of Warren Ellis’ self-published e-book shorts.  This one’s a sci-fi noir detective story set in “a strange dream of a possible city.  A science fiction mystery about theoretical architecture, AI and vintage robotics.”  It has the feel of a graphic novel and was a fun and interesting read.  I especially enjoyed the way it hinted at a larger world (one that Ellis has indicated we might see more of in future shorts).
The BreakBeat Poets (26) – This collection of poetry was put together by a trio of Chicago poets, including Kevin Coval, founder of Louder Than a Bomb.  I’m still fairly new to reading poetry so getting through this took me quite some time.  I thought I was into hip hop, but the sheer number of references that went over my head made it clear that I’ve still got a lot to learn about the genre.  With all that said, I still found this collection full of powerful poems and l dog eared many a page.  Many of the poets involved are from and write about Chicago which is always a plus in my book.

Pages

Categories

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031