Books read in May and June

The Wisdom of Insecurity (5/6) – This was a surprisingly difficult read for so slim of a book. Very powerful though. I found the discourse on the difference between faith and belief very helpful in dealing with my own depression and anxiety. He spends a lot of time attempting to reconcile his views of the infinite with classical religious texts which wasn’t super interesting to me (although probably a large point of the book). I could have done without them but the concept of “us as all” is so difficult to wrap your head around that I won’t complain about the repetitions.

Drones (5/22) – This is the first book of Adam Rothstein’s that I’ve read. I’m a big fan of his writing (both short fiction and journalistic), so I had high expectations for this book. Unfortunately, I’m not really the target audience. If you have even a semi active interest in drones and are familiar with the basics of how historical narratives are written you may find yourself bored at times. There’s some really interesting history, and the chapter on the esthetics of the drone is great, but in between there’s a lot more History 101 than I was expecting.

I read this at the same time as Charlie Stross’s Accelerando and I highly recommend that pairing. The history in Drones reaches back as far as the industrial revolution and you start to get a sense of the acceleration of technological advances as you progress. Accelerando takes that acceleration and straps on rocket skis, giving you the sense that Drones is a sort of historical prequel.

Accelerando (5/28) – One of the problems with writing about the Singularity is that, by definition, the post-Singularity world is fundamentally a different one than ours. Stross handles this beautifully by sidestepping the issue and asking what happens to those left behind. What if you don’t want your consciousness used as a currency by sentient corporations?

I found the “exo cortex” construction a really interesting take on what the technology between here and full brain upload might look like. It got me thinking how something like that could be built right now. The closest thing we have right now are smartphones and the nascent AR/VR kit blooming off them. I’m thinking about products like Google Glass, Pebble and iWatch, and research into gestural and neural interfaces. One thing that really stood out for me is the stark difference between Manfred’s exocortex and today’s smartphones when it comes to ownership. Manfred’s exocortex is a part of his body. He owns it in much the same way you own your kidneys.  We don’t really own our smart devices the same way way.

Blindsight (6/3) – The aliens in this book really felt alien. Beautiful bizarre weirdness. The e-book formatting wasn’t very good so I’d recommend getting an actual book.

Cunning Plans (6/17) – Pop music and magic, technology and British hedge shaman, haunted machines and the state of science fiction. If any of that sounds appealing to you, this book is well worth your time and dollar.  This is the first of Warren Ellis’ new short e-books (he was trying to produce a new one each month but has an Unidentified Neurological Event and put that on hold) and a collection of his recent talks.  I’ve been eagerly awaiting this collection since I generally prefer reading transcripts over watching videos and can’t afford to actually go to all the conferences he speaks at.  I was not disappointed. I don’t totally get the economics behind this only costing 99 cents, but you should all go buy it before they wise up and raise the price.  Some of the talks share themes and subject matter (as Ellis readily admits) but it felt more like reinforcement than recycling.

Books read in April

Difficult Conversations (1st) – A quick read full of the kind of good advice that will be difficult to put into practice.  Like Getting Things Done, it feels like the way to get the most out of this book is to try out their techniques and then read it again.  Experience putting their recommendations into action will help bring out some of the nuance that gets glossed over in a first reading.  Come to think of it this is probably true of most self help books.

Equal Rites (17th) – Another Discworld novel. I know I’m coming to these late but I’m really enjoying them. I read one of this book’s sequels first (Lords and Ladies) so it was kind of interesting to go backwards in the development of the characters and setting. Like all of the Discworld books I’ve read so far it was a ton of fun and a quick read.

Design for the Real World (23rd) – I picked this up based on a Mike Monteiro talk from Webstock ’13 called “How Designers Destroyed the World“.  Who could ignore a talk with a title like that?  I’m really glad I did.  Papanek skewers (in, at times excruciating, detail) the entire design profession.  The thesis is pretty straightforward.  Designers have an outsized effect on the world we live in and to use it for anything but the greater good is an abuse of the skills required to be a designer.  He provides an interesting framework for evaluating whether a design is “good” enough and there are some great examples of good design as well as some hilarious and/or terrifying examples of bad design.  All in all though, there are probably just too many examples and there are some sections that feel pretty dated (the second edition was written in the 80’s).  (There are also some mind blowingly prescient parts too.)  If you’re involved at all in the design of anything (and that includes you, software people), I highly recommend this book, but don’t be afraid to skim sections that feel like a parade of design examples or product ideas. Probably the best book I’ve read this year.

Note: As of this post I’ll be using Amazon affiliate links.  If that bugs you, it’s pretty easy to circumvent.  I promise it’s not going to effect the content here.

Books read in March

I’m trying out something new. I’m going to try recording the books I’ve read each month. I’m hoping it will help read more.

These are the books I read in March (and the date I finished them):

How Google Works (17th) – Smug and self serving. I give them extra points for having fun with the footnotes, though. A solid meh.

Cold as Ice (21st) – Hard science fiction.  Feels a bit noir in places, especially the ending. Interesting to see what older sci fi thought the future of media would look like.

Illuminati Illuminated

This year for New Year’s Eve we went to an “Illuminati” themed party.  I wanted to keep things simple and decide I would just wear my black suit and where some sort of “spooky” pocket square.  While searching for occult pocket squares I came across the Draper, an Instructable for building a glowing pocket square.  Not having the time to order parts (this was December 30th, after all) I decided to see what I could whip up on my own.  Between a battery pack powered strip of LEDs I had lying around, a quick trip to Jo-Ann’s fabrics and some clutch design skill from Deana I had everything I needed.  First, Deana designed me a couple of occult patterns to go under the cloth.

I printed them out on card stock and cut them out to fit my suit pocket (4″ x 6″).  I cut a piece of foam roughly a quarter inch thick and taped that to back of the card stock to help diffuse the LEDs.  Next I taped the LEDs along the back of the foam.  The last step was to cut out a square of white cloth and fold it around the top of the card stock cutout.  I had originally planned to fold the cloth nicely around the card stock and leave it at that, but I was having trouble fitting everything inside the pocket so I ended up just taping the cloth down.

The back of my light up pocket square

It’s not very pretty from this angle, but it got the job done.

Given how little time I had to throw this together I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

A close up of the pocket square

A close up, in the pocket

Ginger Lemon Brandy

On new years day my brothers and I made ginger champagne, as we have in years past. In 2013 I had the bright idea (inspired by this recipe) to use the “waste” from the brewing, i.e. the ginger peel and lemon zest, in an infusion. That turned out to be a a tasty success and we decided to do another infusion this year. I happened to have a large amount of brandy lying around so we decided to experiment with that. This recipe is still basically a riff on that original boozed and infused recipe, but ratcheted way up since we have a lot more leftovers to go around now that we’re making 5 gallon batches of champagne.

Ingredients

  • 0.6 lbs ginger peel (or just ginger if you’re starting from scratch)
  • zest from 5 lemons
  • 1.5 liters brandy
  • leftover boiled ginger from making champagne (optional)
  • simple syrup or agave to taste (optional)

After two weeks I stained and tested the infusion.  Depending on how much ginger you put in you may want to let it sit longer. It was good and gingery but on the sweet side. If you’re starting from scratch you won’t have this problem, you’ll probably want to add simple syrup or agave to taste.

Ginger Brandy Manhattan
2 oz ginger brandy
1 oz dry vermouth
Dash of bitters
Lemon twist

The vermouth and bitters balance out the sweetness of the brandy quite nicely making for a smooth and spicy variation on the classic Manhattan.

The First Cryptopals Learn-A-Long of 2015

Are you interested in cryptography or Internet security? Matt Baker and I are leading another learn-a-long workshop where we all work through Matasano’s cryptopals challenges together.  If you watched the Imitation Game and were wondering what cryptography looks like now, this might be just the thing for you. The next meeting is Wednesday January 21st from 7PM to 9PM at Dev Bootcamp.  None of us are experts — we’ll all be learning this stuff together.  Some people will be just starting out, others are part of the way through the course. Bring your laptop, charger and learning spirit!

The-Imitation-Game

It’s like this, basically, except none of us dress this well.

Ginger champagne 2015

Another year has passed and with the previous night’s exuberance still ringing in our heads, the brothers Shanan got together to brew our annual ginger champagne. The 2014 batch turned out pretty well but we’re still seeing some inconsistencies in the bottles. Some were great but most were a little too sweet and not as carbonated as we’d expected – – both signs of incomplete fermentation in the bottle. It was perfect as a mixer for cocktails, though, and I’m keeping a couple bottles in the hopes that another month or two will be what they need.

Continue reading ‘Ginger champagne 2015′


Pages

Categories

July 2015
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 896 other followers